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RED-TAILED BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE

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RED-TAILED BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE

Bird Species: Cockatoo

Bird Subspecies: Red Tail Black

The red-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii) also known as Banksian- or Banks’ black cockatoo, is a large black cockatoo native to Australia.

Adult males have a characteristic pair of bright red panels on the tail that gives the species its name. It is more common in the drier parts of the continent.

Five subspecies are recognised, differing chiefly in beak size. Although the more northerly subspecies are widespread,

the two southern subspecies, the forest red-tailed black cockatoo and the south-eastern red-tailed black cockatoo are under threat.

The species is usually found in eucalyptus woodlands, or along water courses. In the more northerly parts of the country, these cockatoos are commonly seen in large flocks.

They are seed eaters and cavity nesters, and as such depend on trees with fairly large diameters, generally Eucalyptus.

Populations in southeastern Australia are threatened by deforestation and other habitat alterations. Of the black cockatoos, the red-tailed is the most adaptable to aviculture,[2]

although black cockatoos are much rarer and much more expensive in aviculture outside Australia.[3]

Taxonomy and naming; RED-TAILED BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE

The species complex was first described by the ornithologist John Latham in 1790 as Psittacus banksii,[4] commemorating English botanist Sir Joseph Banks.

The red-tailed black cockatoo also has the distinction of being the first bird from Eastern Australia illustrated by a European, as a female, presumably collected at Endeavour River in north Queensland, was sketched by Banks’ draughtsman Sydney Parkinson in 1770.[5]

Narrowly predating Latham, English naturalist George Shaw described Psittacus magnificus from a specimen collected somewhere in the Port Jackson (now Sydney) region.[6] For many years, the species was referred to as Calyptorhynchus magnificus,[7] proposed by Gregory Mathews in 1927 as Shaw’s name had predated Latham’s 1790 description.

For several decades, Mathews’ proposal was accepted by many authorities, although it was unclear whether the original Port Jackson reference had actually referred to the red-tailed black or, more likely, the glossy black cockatoo. In 1994, an application to conserve Calyptorhynchus banksii as the scientific name was accepted by the ICZN.[8]

The red-tailed black cockatoo is the type species of the genus Calyptorhynchus,[9] the name of which is derived from the Greek calypto-/καλυπτο- “hidden” and rhynchus/ρυγχος “beak”.[10]

The change was first made by Anselme Gaëtan Desmarest in 1826.[11]

RED TAIL BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE

In 1827, Jennings proposed the name Psittacus niger for the bird.[12]

The binomial combination had already been used by Carl Linnaeus for the lesser vasa parrot in 1758,[13] and by Johann Friedrich Gmelin for the palm cockatoo in 1788;

it was thus invalid even though both other species were already known by different names at the time. Alternate common names include Banks’ black cockatoo, Banksian black cockatoo, or simply black cockatoo.[14]

Indigenous people of the central Cape York Peninsula have several names for the bird: (minha) pachang in Pakanh; (inh -) inhulg in Uw Oykangand; and (inh -) anhulg in Uw Olkola. (The bracketed prefix (inh- or minha) is a qualifier meaning ‘meat’ or ‘animal’.)[15]

Ngarnarrh or karnamarr are terms used by the Kunwinjku of Arnhem Land.[16][17] In Central Australia, southwest of Alice Springs, the Pitjantjatjara term for the subspecies C. b. samueli is iranti.[18]

Karrak is a Noongar term derived from the call for the southwestern race C. b. naso.[19] In the language of the Bungandidj of south-eastern South Australia and western Victoria this bird was called treen.[20]

Classification;RED-TAILED BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE

The red-tailed black cockatoo’s closest relative is the glossy black cockatoo; the two species form the subgenus Calyptorhynchus within the genus of the same name.[14]

They are distinguished from the other black cockatoos of the subgenus Zanda by their significant sexual dimorphism and calls of the juveniles; one a squeaking begging call, the other a vocalization when swallowing food.[14][21]

A 1999 mtDNA phylogenetic study of cockatoos utilizing among others, the red-tailed black cockatoo supported the hypotheses that cockatoos originated in Australia before

the Paleogene and Neogene periods (66 mya, marking the end of the Mesozoic, to 2.6 mya) and that the genus Cacatua diversified in two separate radiations to the islands of Indonesia,

New Guinea, and the South Pacific. It concluded that the first extant cockatoo to diverge from the ancestral cockatoos was the palm cockatoo, followed by a subclade containing the black cockatoos.[22]

A 2008 mitochondrial and nuclear DNA phylogenetic study of the parrots, cockatoos and related taxa by utilizing among others the yellow-tailed black cockatoo,

provides confirmatory evidence for a Gondwanaland origin of the ancestral parrots in the Cretaceous period, and an Australasia divergence of the ancestral cockatoos from the parrots in

either late Cretaceous (66 mya) or Paleogene (45 mya) periods depending on baseline assumptions.[23]

Five subspecies are recognised; they differ mainly in the size and shape of the beak, the overall bird size and female colouration:[24]

  • C. b. banksii is found in Queensland and, rarely, in far northern New South Wales; it is the largest subspecies by overall body size and has a moderate-sized bill.[24]
  • It merges with subspecies macrorhynchus around the Gulf of Carpentaria. It has disappeared from much of its former range in northern New South Wales and southeast Queensland.[25]
  • C. b. graptogyne, (Endangered)[26] known as the south-eastern red-tailed black cockatoo, is found in southwestern Victoria
  • and southeastern South Australia in an area bordered by Mount Gambier to the west, Portland to the south, Horsham to the northeast and Bordertown to the north.[27]
  • The smallest of the five subspecies,[24] it was only recognised as distinct in the 1980s.[28][29]
  • It is predominantly dependent on stands of Eucalyptus baxteri (brown stringybark), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (river redgum) and Allocasuarina luehmannii (buloke) for feeding and nesting.[30]
  • These tree species have been all threatened by land clearing and most remaining are on private land; possibly only 500–1000 individuals remain.[31]
  • The subspecies and its habitat are the subject of a national recovery plan.[32] In 2007 local landowners are being reimbursed for assisting in regenerating suitable habitat.[33]
  • C. b. macrorhynchus, given the name great-billed cockatoo by Mathews,[34] is found across northern Australia. RED TAIL BLACK COCKATOO FOR SALE
  • Although thought to be widespread and abundant, this subspecies has been little studied. It is also large and has a large beak, as its subspecific name implies.
  • Females lack red colouration in their tails.[7]
  • C. b. naso (Vulnerable)[35] is known as the forest red-tailed black cockatoo and is found in the southwest corner of Western Australia between Perth and Albany.
  • This form has a larger bill,[36] and favours marri (Corymbia (formerly Eucalyptus) calophylla), jarrah (E. marginata) and karri (E. diversicolor).[37]
  • C. b. samueli exists in four scattered populations: in central coastal Western Australia from the Pilbara south to the northern Wheatbelt in the vicinity of Northam,
  • and inland river courses in Central Australia, southwestern Queensland and the upper Darling River system in Western New South Wales.
  • Birds of this subspecies are generally smaller with smaller bills than the nominate banksii.[38]

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